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Leonardo Da Vinci's famous work exhibition, the greatest is the aircraft tank manuscript, not the Mona Lisa
time:2019-11-06 ; Number of visits:5882

  On October 24, the 500th anniversary of leonardo Da Vinci's death was commemorated with the "Da Vinci exhibition" at the Louvre in France, which featured about 15 paintings, 160 drawings and manuscripts, and a comprehensive review of his career.

For critic Jonathan Jones, the exhibition "reveals more fully than ever Da Vinci's true identity as a scientist, inventor, engineer and infinitely curious observer of life, rather than just a great classical master." "The greatest Da Vinci work France has is not the Mona Lisa, but manuscript B -- on the left side of the exhibit, an exact design of a helicopter in clear ink lines, and a sketch of an armored tank. That's what the Da Vinci show at the Louvre shows why it's worth the hassle of celebrating his 500th birthday.

One of the most eagerly awaited events in the series marking the 500th anniversary of leonardo Da Vinci, the Louvre Da Vinci exhibition, may at first glance fail to live up to expectations. With Italian museum, and the Louvre for other version of the "Mona Lisa" gallery has positioned itself as a "center of leonardo Da Vinci" resistance, the means, and in 2011 the British national gallery blockbuster exhibition than leonardo Da Vinci, the exhibition will be collected less oil paintings.

(note: France is treating the upcoming exhibition of leonardo's work at the Louvre as a major event. Italy, however, suddenly seemed to accuse France of trying to steal the show, suggesting that the paintings were too fragile to be exhibited and calling for a renegotiation of the loan agreement reached between the Louvre and the previous Italian government. Both countries claim Da Vinci as their own, and the escalating war of words has almost eclipsed his work.)

A drawing of an aircraft in leonardo's manuscript

  A drawing of an aircraft in leonardo's manuscript  

But you'll soon realize that it wasn't a mistake -- or that it was a very happy mistake. This will be the great Da Vinci exhibition of our time, for it will reveal for the first time the true identity of Da Vinci as a scientist, inventor, engineer and infinitely curious observer of life, rather than just a great master of classical painting. The exhibition is a brainstorming session that reveals why we can never tire of geniuses who dreamed of the future five centuries ago.

The greatest leonardo work France has is not the Mona Lisa, but manuscript B. This is a medium-sized notebook on loan from the French institute. When it was opened for display, I cried out with delight, "good for you, leonardo!" On the left page of the exhibit is a precise drawing of the helicopter's design with clear ink lines, based on a huge auger going up through the air. There is also a quick sketch that looks like a flying saucer but is actually an armoured tank.

Leonardo Da Vinci's manuscript of aircraft equipment

  Leonardo Da Vinci's manuscript of aircraft equipment

  On another page, Da Vinci's punk vision of airplanes gets even bolder. A man stands in the wooden cockpit of a flying machine, flapping the wings up and down. While helicopters and tanks were bold fantasies, the design of a flying machine that mimics the flight of birds fascinated him all his life and became more believable as he improved. That's why this manuscript is more important than the Mona Lisa. The painting depicts Da Vinci changing from an artist to a man of many talents soon after he moved from his native Tuscany to milan, the powerful military industrial state.

Vitruvian man, Da Vinci, c. 1490


  Vitruvian man, Da Vinci, c. 1490

  That's what the Da Vinci show at the Louvre shows why it's worth the hassle of celebrating his 500th birthday. In 1519, when leonardo was invited to spend his final years asa court artist with king Francis I, his biographer, Giorgio Vasari, said that Francis valued leonardo asa "philosopher" and liked to talk to him about ideas. In other words, Da Vinci's ideas were taken seriously. Half a millennium later, however, the art world holds such a conservative view of the "classical master". The story of leonardo Da Vinci in our time is "messiah," a painting of a forgotten Christ holding a translucent sphere that was restored and eventually attributed to leonardo and sold at auction for 342,182,751 pounds, a record for an artwork sold at auction. Is this painting genuine? Will it be shown in the exhibition as planned? We'll get to that. But one thing needs to be said: the early Da Vinci was the first conceptual artist in history, and it was unfair for him to blindly worship his classical paintings from beginning to end.

Controversial leonardo Da Vinci's messiah

  Controversial leonardo Da Vinci's messiah

  Before waiting to see the exhibition, I visited the Mona Lisa and felt the current cult of leonardo's paintings. The Louvre is now permanently displaying the Mona Lisa in a glass case, and the chaos of visiting it is so overwhelming that you can only experience it for 30 seconds as the crowds crowd around it. It's not long enough for anyone. It's about taking pictures, not looking and thinking. This madness is the result of conservative reverence for leonardo's shiny finished painting.

The audience clocked in at the Mona Lisa

  The audience clocked in at the Mona Lisa

  The Louvre is making up for its lack of experience with an exhibition that captures the real flow of leonardo's thoughts. The original pages of the Atlantic codex show Da Vinci's explorations of geometry and optics, the moon and mountains, and his fascination with flight. (Codex Atlanticus, the world's largest collection of Da Vinci manuscripts and paintings, covers subjects from mathematics to science, architecture, technology and the BBC.) Some of the most stunning paintings in the exhibition observe in astonishing detail how birds use updrafts and winds to enhance their flight. Da Vinci was also convinced that humans could learn how to fly from birds, and he thought that if flying machines could also make use of air currents, they might get the lift they needed.

Bird in flight, edwardmuybridge


  Bird in flight, edwardmuybridge

  Da Vinci's thinking and drawing, nearly four centuries later, was verified by Eadweard Muybridge's first photograph of a bird in flight in the 1880s. Da Vinci was a camera whose powers of observation and painting were so developed that he could record everyday life in a way that transcends time. When he sketched Bernardo di Bandini Baroncelli's hanging body in Florence in December 1479, he sketched out in a few lines the dark sockets of his eyes and the faded cheeks of his face. It was like we were standing next to them. Da Vinci even depicted the exotic Turkish costume baroncelli wore when he was brought back from Constantinople and hanged to face lorenzo DE Medici's revenge.

Bernardo di Bandini Baroncelli's sketch of the hanging body of leonardo Da Vinci

  Bernardo di Bandini Baroncelli's sketch of the hanging body of leonardo Da Vinci

Baby and cat play, leonardo Da Vinci

  Baby and cat play, leonardo Da Vinci

  Da Vinci was also a video camera. Da Vinci created a sketch of a baby playing with a cat in Florence around 1480. The movement is a series of blurred posturing as the event takes place -- a unique multiple of Da Vinci's images, which also appear in a painting of saint Sebastian and a painting of a knight fighting a dragon. These early sketches show him trying to draw events as fast as they happen, and somehow keep the complex flow of reality on paper. In a picture of his unfinished paintings "maggie's worship (The Adoration of The tells), it becomes a mental derangement of overload. He tries to accommodate war, architecture, and the infinite vista of retreating into the fuzzy chaos of nature in a perspective that is about to disappear. It was dazzling. This boy from rural Tuscany has an unstoppable brain that he will use alone for the rest of his life to understand nature and invent technology.

The Battle of Anghiari, a study of the heads of two soldiers, by leonardo Da Vinci

  The Battle of Anghiari, a study of the heads of two soldiers, by leonardo Da Vinci

  Da Vinci's attempt to reconcile science and art led him to many projects, but very little was really accomplished. These important paintings, including the unfinished copy of "the Battle of Anghiari," will be displayed in the exhibition.

St. John the Baptist, Da Vinci, c. 1513-1516

  St. John the Baptist, Da Vinci, c. 1513-1516

  Surrounded by all this excitement, it's hard to care about "messiah." After all, the owner of the world's most expensive painting did not lend it out -- only to fuel speculation about its dubious provenance. But there is even worse news: another version from leonardo's studio, messiah, and other paintings from the royal collection will appear in the exhibition. They look so stable and stiff compared to the vibrant images of smiling babies, flying birds and upright horses. You realize that it doesn't matter whether "messiah" is an original or not, because it's the most boring creation.

Virgin Mary and saint Anne, leonardo Da Vinci

  Virgin Mary and saint Anne, leonardo Da Vinci

Saint John the Baptist (also known as the burlington portrait), Da Vinci

  Saint John the Baptist (also known as the burlington portrait), Da Vinci

  The artefact pieces will be displayed alongside leonardo Da Vinci's "st John the Baptist" in the Louvre, which shows st John looking out of the darkness with a spiritual and sensual sensuality. On the opposite wall hangs the virgin and saint Anne, the last and greatest leonardo painting in existence. To add to this sublime gathering, the national gallery has lent st John the Baptist (also known as the burlington portrait). Da Vinci these miracles extend the known boundaries. The virgin Mary and saint Anne achieved what leonardo Da Vinci tried to do as a young man: to contain the world in a painting. In the foreground, the rocks and strata show his interest in geology; The distant blue Alps melt into a crystalline world, like a model of the earth; At the heart of it all are women and children -- mothers, sons, grandmothers. Why do we have two mothers? Freud discovered that Da Vinci had two mothers, his biological mother, caterina, a country girl whom his father had never married, and his stepmother, amadori. Is Da Vinci looking back on his childhood in his last and most satisfying painting? In the burlington portrait, we see two mothers, but the old woman's face is as miserable as the man who was hanged. It is a scene of hope and despair.

Viewers can wear VR headsets to meet the "real" lisa del giocondo

  Viewers can wear VR headsets to meet the "real" lisa del giocondo

  But the Louvre could not completely ignore the Mona Lisa. At the exhibition, you can wear a VR headset to meet the "real" lisa del giocondo, the wife of a Florentine silk merchant who modeled for leonardo Da Vinci in 1503. An encounter with a digitally manipulated actress in virtual reality gives her Mona Lisa's long, thin nose and deep-set eyes, which can feel elusive.

        It was such a clever trick that leonardo Da Vinci would have liked it. He may have preferred the digital Mona Lisa to his own. One thread running through leonardo's painting experiments was his belief that accurate perspective could reflect and create the world. Virtual reality creates an impregnable illusion, a Renaissance dream come true. It's impossible to exhaust leonardo's science fiction predictions, but this exhibition opens his notebook to the world as a scientist, inventor, engineer and infinitely curious observer of life.

Virgin of the rocks, Da Vinci, 1483-1486

  Virgin of the rocks, Da Vinci, 1483-1486

  The exhibition will run until February 24, 2020.

Leonardo Da Vinci's famous work exhibition, the greatest is the aircraft tank manuscript, not the Mona Lisa

source:The Internet
 



















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